National Co-ordinator:
Ricky Brisson
P.O. Box 7420
Bondi Beach 2026 NSW
E-mail:
 
     
 

The Australian Intercountry Adoption Network (AICAN) was founded in 1990 and is the national network of non-government organisations (NGOs) involved in international adoption.  More...

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May 2014

Finding Mum And Dad
www.youtube.com www.youtube.com

/showurl.php?url=3047 Adotion Parties, where waiting children and hopeful adoptive parents are brought together for a few hours of fun and games, are being trialed by several adoption agencies. These agencies hope that the parties will be a more successful way of finding families for their most hard to place children. We hear from an adoptive family who found their son at such a party, and some of the prospective adopters who are about to attend them. However the main focus of this moving documentary, are brothers Connor and Daniel, as well as eight year old Scott. All hard to place older children, their foster carers and social workers hope that the right adoptive families will find them at an adoption party – if not, all three boys face spending the rest of their childhoods in care.
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Useful Links: Assorted


Mission in Action - Charity begins at home, but that is not where it should end.
missioninaction.com.au missioninaction.com.au

/showurl.php?url=3082 Mission in Action was founded in 2004 by the Budulica Family from Australia. The aim of Mission in Action it to make difference to people who are in some form of crisis with poverty, hunger or disease. Mission in Action (MIA) is wholeheartedly dedicated to the children in their care at Nakuru Children's Home. We endeavour to raise the children in a loving, safe Christian family environment offering them education and opportunities to become productive future members of their community.
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Aid Organisations: Kenya


Protecting Our Children
www.dailymotion.com www.dailymotion.com

/showurl.php?url=3046 This three part series followed social workers as they worked with vulnerable families in their area, and made decisions about when to take children into care
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Useful Links: Assorted


Love is not Enough : The Journey to Adoption and Life after Adoption
vimeo.com vimeo.com

/showurl.php?url=3045 This eight part series followed four families in the late 1990′s, as they went through an intensive home study process and adopted their children (both domestic and international adoption). The filmmakers then followed up to see what life was like several years after adoption. Very in depth, this is still relevant and worth watching 14 years after it first aired
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Useful Links: Assorted


Adoption Authority of Ireland
aai.gov.ie aai.gov.ie

/showurl.php?url=3079 The Adoption Act 2010 commenced on 1st November 2010. This coincided with Ireland's formal ratification of the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption. The Adoption Authority was also established on that day. The purpose of the Adoption Act, 2010, is to improve standards in both domestic and intercountry adoption. The regulatory framework governing adoption has been strengthened in an attempt to ensure that the best interests of children are protected at every step throughout the adoption process. With effect from 1 November 2010 inter-country adoptions can be effected with other countries which have ratified the Hague Convention or with which Ireland has a bilateral agreement.

From the 1st November 2010 anyone wishing to effect an adoption from a Hague country must be satisfied that the adoption is in compliance with the rules set out in the Hague Convention. The key rules to be adhered to are:

1. the adoption must comply with all the terms and conditions of the Hague Convention
2. the agent/agency handling the adoption is properly accredited by the Central Authority of the sending State
3. the agent/agency can produce a valid Article 23 Certificate from a competent authority of the sending State in respect of the adoption

The Hague Convention website (www.hcch.net) has details of the Convention and a list of the Central Authorities, the Accredited Bodies and the Competent Authorities in each country
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Useful Links: Ireland


The Hygiene Hypothesis
www.sarahpsalmon.com www.sarahpsalmon.com

/showurl.php?url=3077 The next time you catch your toddler putting something disgusting in its mouth, you can soothe yourself with the so-called ‘hygiene hypothesis’. According to this theory, “exposure to infectious agents early in life offers protection against allergic diseases. The more hygienic a child’s environment, the greater the risk”.

I’m not advocating that you feed your child spoiled food, or make them lick the floor. But the next time you find your child nibbling on a dead cockroach, be grateful that they are building up their immune system.
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Blogs: Expat Parents


A Home For Maisie
www.dailymotion.com www.dailymotion.com

/showurl.php?url=3044 In her eight years of life, Maisie has lived in ten different homes and been through two adoption disruptions. She has significant emotional and behavioural needs. Social services have placed her for adoption one final time, with a couple who have already adopted eight older children, but if this doesn’t work out, Maisie will spend the rest of her childhood in care. This documentary follows the family and Maisie as they go through therapy at Family Futures, an organisation with a 95% success rate at keeping families together
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Useful Links: Assorted


April 2014

Pays d'accueil
www.coeuradoption.org www.coeuradoption.org

/showurl.php?url=-3078 Informations sur l'adoption dans d'autres pays d'accueil que la France.
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International Children's Aid (ICA)
www.internationalchildrensaid.org www.internationalchildrensaid.org

/showurl.php?url=3081 International Children's Aid (ICA) is a non-profit organization and a registered charity based in Australia. ICA aims to assist abandoned and orphaned children in developing countries. We provide the basic necessities of life in a caring environment which is culturally appropriate. Our support continues as the children make the transition to adulthood.

ICA began in 1976 by providing shelter, food, medical assistance, clothing, schooling and job training to children in the Asian sub continent. We also sent Australian Volunteers to Sri Lanka.

Through donations and fundraising ICA has built a children's village at Rambukkana with 3 family cottages and an onsite pre-school and a vocational training centre. A Nutrition Centre for sick babies and a Toddlers Home was built at the Peter Weerasekera Home at Dambuwa.
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Aid Organisations: Sri Lanka


Australia streamlining efforts to make adoptions easier from several countries
www.dailytelegraph.com.au www.dailytelegraph.com.au

/showurl.php?url=3080 Australia will also open a new programs with South Africa immediately and work to open discussions with Kenya, Bulgaria, Latvia, Poland, the USA, Cambodia and Vietnam. This changes will expand previously announced changes that mean adoption orders issued in Taiwan and South Korea can now be recognised automatically in Australia.
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Media: Australia


Learn about Other Countries through the 5 Senses
kidworldcitizen.org kidworldcitizen.org

/showurl.php?url=3068 Often times, lessons to help kids learn about other countries are geared toward older children. This is a lesson plan to present a new country to kids as young as preschool- in a way that they will remember! They will explore and learn about other countries using their five senses: seeing, touching, listening, tasting, and smelling their way to discover a new place. I recently presented this lesson about Ethiopia in my son’s preschool class, and the kids loved it. It can be easily adapted to any country, with a bit of research.
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Useful Links: Education Material for Teachers & Parents


Everything to Me
www.youtube.com www.youtube.com

/showurl.php?url=3067 Mark Schultz music video of his song "Everything to Me" dedicated to his birth mother and the most important gift she ever gave him... life.
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Useful Links: Assorted


Negativity and Adoption
www.adoption.net www.adoption.net

/showurl.php?url=3066 I have been blogging about my adoption experience for about 4 years now. I have grown immensely through my blogging. It helped me cope. Through writing I was able to process all the feelings I had in my head and couldn’t say out loud. It gave me strength and courage. As my blog started to gain more readers, some of those readers were definitely not fans of my views on adoption. There are some people who do not agree with adoption. They hate me and other birth moms when we talk positively about our adoption experience. They speak of abandonment, being forced, being coaxed. I did not abandon my child, I was not forced to place, and I was not coaxed. I made the choice I felt was best for my baby.
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Blogs: Birth Parents


Adoptions Australia 2012-2013
www.aihw.gov.au www.aihw.gov.au

/showurl.php?url=2987 This report contains comprehensive information on adoptions in Australia, including the characteristics of adopted children, adoptive families and birth mothers. It also reports on the processing times for intercountry adoption, as well as on applications and vetoes lodged by parties to adoptions concerning contact and information exchange. During 2012-13, there were 339 finalised adoptions across Australia. Among these adoptions: -46% were 'known' child adoptions, 38% were intercountry, and 16% were local -84% of intercountry adoptees came from Asia -52% of 'known' adoptions were by carers, such as foster parents -51% of adopted children were aged under 5.
Adoptions Australia 2012-13 (1.5 MB PDF)
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Statistics: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare


Ethiopiaid Australia Foundation
ethiopiaid.org.au ethiopiaid.org.au

/showurl.php?url=3065 Welcome to the Ethiopiaid Australia Foundation. We're a small, sustainable charity committed to changing lives. Through our partnerships with local NGOs, we are empowering Ethiopian men, women and children to lift themselves from poverty. You can join us. From buying hospital gowns for fistula patients, to building preschools for young kids: Every dollar counts. You can be a part of this incredible change. Find out how.
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Aid Organisations: Ethiopia


Australian African Childrens Aid & Support Assoc (AACASA)
www.aacasa.org.au www.aacasa.org.au

/showurl.php?url=3064 AACASA's aims are:
1) To encourage and support Australian families in adopting African children for whom authorities in their countries of birth consider overseas adoption the most appropriate choice of care.
2) To provide information advice and support for families who have adopted from African countries.
3) To support and encourage proper inter-country adoption practices in accordance with The Hague Convention on Inter-country Adoption.
4) To support African children and the maintenance of their culture within their Australian community.
5) To provide aid and support to African children in need as well as for those awaiting adoption.
6) To promote understanding and support for inter-country adoption within the Australian community. AACASA works in co-operation with the State/Territory adoption units and other non-government organisations to achieve these aims.
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Aid Organisations: Ethiopia


Hopes&Dreams Foundation
www.hopesanddreams.com.au www.hopesanddreams.com.au

/showurl.php?url=3063 In 2008, the Hopes&Dreams Foundation was established out of a desire to more effectively distribute funds and resources directly to those in need. The Hopes&Dreams Foundation is an Australian funded, volunteer based, non-profit, non-political, non-religious foundation. Fundamental needs that we take for granted, such as food, medical, education, basic utilities and housing, are out of reach for many people in developing countries. We believe that every life has a right to these.
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Aid Organisations: Ethiopia


Children's Aid Network Inc.
cani.org.au cani.org.au

/showurl.php?url=3062 CAN I exists to help, support and enhance children's quality of life by providing essential care (food, shelter, protection and love). To protect and advocate for children's rights whilst empowering them by providing education and opportunities to stay within their own communities. To raise awareness of children in need and support those who care for them. Children are our only future so ... CAN I promises to do all we can, in all ways we can, in all places we can, for as long as we can.
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Aid Organisations: Korea, South


Queensland Adoption of Children Act 1964  
www.legislation.qld.gov.au www.legislation.qld.gov.au
An Act to make provision about the adoption of children and to make related amendments of the Adoption of Children Act 1964, the Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 2003 and the Child Protection Act 1999 and to make consequential amendments of other Acts as stated in schedule 2
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Legislation/Agreements: Queensland


The Curry Club - A Network for Adoptive Fathers
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com

/showurl.php?url=3061 The Curry Club is a network for Australian men to explore issues of inter-country adoption, culture and fatherhood whilst simultaneously enjoying a bloody good curry. It is open to prospective and adoptive fathers. Events are currently limited to SA.

Becoming an adoptive father of a child born overseas is a big decision and it is one that is truly life changing. Sadly there is little pre and post adoption support available that is tailored to meet the needs of such men. I mean what red blooded Aussie male really wants to be trapped in a training room discussing their emotions with a social worker and a bunch of strangers? Terrified at the prospect of such cruel and unusual punishment, a small group of brave fathers began an epic quest to find a better way! In their tireless research into adoptive fatherhood and overseas adoption, these intrepid pioneers stumbled across two chance discoveries.

1) Curry (or spicy food) is part of the cuisine of all of the major countries from which Australian's currently adopt, &
2) 97% of Australian men love a bloody good curry. (Source: The Byemoore Curry Institute 2006.)

It was a Eureka moment and with that the Curry Club was born!
The Curry Club is a chance for men to explore issues of inter-country adoption, culture and fatherhood whilst simultaneously enjoying a bloody good curry. Members of the Curry Club are encouraged to cook curries from the birth country of their adopted child(ren) and to share these with other fathers and prospective fathers.
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Facebook: Australia


Australians Caring for Children
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com

/showurl.php?url=3060 Australians Caring for Children Inc is a voluntary, non-political and non-sectarian association formed in 1987 by a number of families who have adopted children from overseas and were moved and touched by the plight of orphaned, abandoned and destitute children.

Australians Caring for Children Inc (ACC) is a non-profit association, whose main objectives are to provide support to adoptive families in Australia and to provide aid to orphaned and abandoned children in developing countries.

The ACC membership is made up of adoptive families, non-adoptive families, sponsors and individuals supporting our aims and objectives.
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Facebook: Australia


Australian Families for Children Inc.
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com

/showurl.php?url=3059 Australian Families for Children Inc. provides intercountry adoption services to families and adoptees residing in NSW.

To provide a high quality adoption service to families in Australia wishing to adopt children from overseas countries in need of adoptive families.

Australian Families for Children Inc. (AFC) is a not- for-profit organisation founded in 1980 to facilitate intercountry adoption. More than 300 children from Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and India have been adopted into Australian families, due to AFC’s help.

AFC is committed to helping children who are orphaned, abandoned and /or destitute without a possibility of family life in their country of birth. Our commitment is to creating a permanent home with a family in Australia for those children.
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Facebook: Australia


Adoption Awareness Australia
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com

/showurl.php?url=3058 November is celebrated in many countries as Adoption Month.
Lets raise awareness about the children needing adoptive families.

November is celebrated in many countries as Adoption Month. Every child deserves to grow up in a loving and supportive family environment. In Australia, thousands of children languish in foster care while government departments procrastinate about their future. Around the world - millions of children are abandoned, relinquished or orphaned. The lucky ones find their way into an orphanage, whilst others live on the streets struggling to survive. Adoption is a positive option for many of these children. Adoption Awareness Australia aims to raise awareness of the needs of children both in Australia and overseas in need of adoptive families. Adoption Awareness Australia supports the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Hague Convention in respect of Intercountry Adoption. Adoption Awareness Australia supports the need to reform the adoption process in Australia so that children stuck in the foster care system and in overseas orphanages instead of growing up in institutions. We hope that you will help us spread the word.
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Facebook: Australia


Adoption Australia
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com

/showurl.php?url=3057 Adoption supporters and advocates of children's rights - working together to bring about change and better outcomes for kids.

Adoptees, adoptive parents, adoption supporters and advocates of children's rights - working together to bring about change and better outcomes for kids.
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Facebook: Australia


Words of wisdom from an adoptee
whileabroad.com whileabroad.com

/showurl.php?url=3055 Christine Brewer is a happy, well-adjusted young woman who was adopted when she was an infant. She recently started a blog to help parents and adopted children to understand the pain and confusion that can surround adoption and how it can be transformed. Christine was kind enough to answer some questions for Adopting While Abroad.
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Blogs: Assorted


Connection Parenting and Optimal Child Development
www.connectionparenting.com www.connectionparenting.com

/showurl.php?url=3054 "Let's raise children who won't have to recover from their childhood."
-- Pam Leo
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Useful Links: Parenting


The Not So Secret Life Of An Adoptee
www.thenotsosecretlifeofanadoptee.com www.thenotsosecretlifeofanadoptee.com

Blogs: Assorted


ReMoved
www.youtube.com www.youtube.com

/showurl.php?url=3038 We made ReMoved with the desire that it would be used to serve in bringing awareness, encourage, and be useful in foster parent training, and raising up foster parents. If you would like to use the film for any of these reasons, the answer is yes. Originally created for the 168 Film Festival, ReMoved follows the emotional story through the eyes of a young girl taken from her home and placed into foster care.
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Useful Links: Assorted


AICAN - Australian InterCountry Adoption Network
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com

/showurl.php?url=1997 The Australian Intercountry Adoption Network (AICAN) was founded in 1990 and is the national network of non-government organisations (NGOs) involved in international adoption.

AICAN offers the largest source of adoption resources in Australians and works closely with both local and foreign bodies involved in intercountry adoptions.

The AICAN website is updated regularly with articles, statistics, newsgroups, and other resources useful to the Australian adoption community.

AICAN is a self funding body manned by volunteers.
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Facebook: Australia


NSW Adoption Regulation 2003
www.legislation.nsw.gov.au www.legislation.nsw.gov.au
Legislation/Agreements: New South Wales


US school provides worst bullying advice ever
www.essentialkids.com.au www.essentialkids.com.au

/showurl.php?url=3043 When I send my son off to school each day I do so in the belief teachers will do their best to protect him, and all children, from bullying. It's nice to think school staff will be there to listen and act if our sons or daughters are taunted, called names, made to fear for their safety or physically attacked by the playground thug. But if parents at one US school also held these beliefs, they recently learned they were sadly mistaken. Instead parents at Zeman Elementary School, Nebraska were informed teachers would much prefer it if victims of bullying would simply shut-up about it. Not only that, but they advise victims of bullying to be nice to their tormentor and treat them as a friend. The bullied students are told to not defend themselves, to learn to laugh at themselves and to not be a sore losers. Nobody likes a sore loser apparently, bullies on the other hand seem to qualify for Student Of The Year at Zeman.
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Blogs: USA


Cycle 4 Cambodia
www.facebook.com www.facebook.com
Our Mission is to help break the cycle of human trafficking, by making people aware of the global situation of human trafficking, with a focus on sex trafficking in Cambodia. Our goal is to fundraise to support local organisations who work with local people on local solutions.
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Aid Organisations: Cambodia


Australians Caring for Children
www.accau.org www.accau.org

/showurl.php?url=3041 Australians Caring for Children Inc is a voluntary, non-political and non-sectarian association formed in 1987 by a number of families who have adopted children from overseas, through the assistance of Australian Families for Children.

Australians Caring for Children Inc (ACC) is a non-profit association, whose main objectives are to provide support to adoptive families in Australia and to provide aid to orphaned and abandoned children in developing countries.

The ACC membership is made up of adoptive families, non-adoptive families, sponsors and individuals supporting our aims and objectives.
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Aid Organisations: Bolivia, Colombia, Ethiopia, India


Eagles Wings China
www.eagleswingschina.org www.eagleswingschina.org
To provide care and improved quality of life for disabled abandoned children in a long term, loving family environment.

A dedicated therapy, schooling and vocational training area where children can receive assistance according to their needs.

Employment and Training of local workers to meet the needs of our disabled children.

Prepare children who have been allocated to an adoptive family to take their place in it.

Market and manage a Sponsorship Program to both benefit the children and workers in Eagles Wings and raise awareness of China's poverty.
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Aid Organisations: China


Child protection system needs more adoption, argues new report
www.abc.net.au www.abc.net.au

/showurl.php?url=3036 Dr Jeremy Sammut argues the current policy of keeping families together is not working, and more children should be remove permanently and offered for adoption.
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Articles: Australia, Jeremy Sammut


Still Damaging and Disturbing: Australian Child Protection Data and the Need for National Adoption Targets by Jeremy Sammut
www.cis.org.au www.cis.org.au

/showurl.php?url=3035 In December 2013, the Abbott government announced plans to make it easier for Australian parents to adopt children both locally and from overseas. Acknowledging the official ‘taboo’ on adoption in Australia, Prime Minister Tony Abbott ordered an inter-departmental committee to recommend ways to take adoption out of the ‘too-hard’ basket.

The chief barrier to raising the number of local adoptions is that state and territory child protection authorities almost never take legal action to free children for adoption, even for children who languish in Australia’s ever-expanding ‘out-of-home’ care (OOHC) system with little prospect of safely returning home.
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Articles: Australia, Jeremy Sammut


Lifelong Issues in Adoption by Deborah N. Silverstein and Sharon Kaplan  
www.aican.org www.aican.org
Adoption is a lifelong, intergenerational process which unites the triad of birth families, adoptees and adoptive families forever. Adoption, especially of adolescents, can lead to both great joy and tremendous pain. Recognising the core issues in adoption is one intervention that can assist triad members and professionals working in adoption better to understand each other and the residual effects of the adoption experience. Adoption triggers seven lifelong or core issues for all triad members, regardless of the circumstances of the adoption or the characteristics of the participants:

Loss
Rejection
Guilt and Shame
Grief
Identity
Intimacy
Mastery/Control
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Health: Assorted




Survey Results: Families Who Are Interested in Adopting Older Children or Sibling Groups  
www.aican.org www.aican.org
Surveys: Adopting Older Children, Adopting Sibling Groups




Survey Results: Families Who Have Adopted Older Children or Sibling Groups  
www.aican.org www.aican.org
Surveys: Adopting Older Children, Adopting Sibling Groups


"Quite A Journey" - Australian Parents' Experience of Adopting Older - Children from Overseas Orphanages - "This is such a personal, personal journey. It's so emotional. No one can really, really fully understand it until you've been through it."  
www.aican.org www.aican.org
Over the past 30 years, intercountry adoption has become an increasingly popular means of family formation in Australia. Despite this, there are gaps in what is known about the experiences of Australian adoptive parents. Many of the children adopted into Australia from overseas are past infancy when they enter their new families, something that is associated with an increased risk of childhood problems and decreased parental satisfaction. Although many Australian parents have incorporated older children into their family, little is known of what this experience is like for parents as very few studies have invited parents to tell their story. Even less is known about the experience of adoptive fathers, as fathers are under-represented in studies of parenting generally and adoptive parenting specifically. This study aimed to go some way towards rectifying these omissions.

Using the qualitative paradigm, 28 parents (13 fathers and 15 mothers) were interviewed about their experiences of adopting children over the age of 24 months from orphanages in China, Ethiopia, India and Thailand. Parents were invited to talk about any aspects of their experience. Although parents' experiences and recollections were diverse, almost all parents had been confronted by difficult child behaviours, at least initially. Contrary to previous research, gender of child, length of institutional care of child or age of child at placement did not seem related to parents' experience of parenting.

From interviews with parents, six major themes emerged: the long wait and intense emotions of adoption; the disparity between experiences and expectations; understanding of children's previous difficult life circumstances; parenting teaching about previously unrecognised aspects of self; parents' perception that they had to be seen to be coping; and unmet needs.

Despite the challenges presented by their children, parents were reluctant to use support services because they perceived themselves to be scrutinised and feared repercussions if they did seek support. Mothers blamed themselves for their childrens behavioural problems, rather than attributing difficulties to children's previous adverse life events. Although several parents did seek assistance, they generally found professionals ill-informed and unhelpful.

Parents made a number of recommendations about how the process of adoptive parenting could be improved. They recommended the routine provision of a variety of services, including counselling for children, parents and couples. Parents expressed a strong desire for more information both pre- and post-placement, including information about what types of problems to expect and what services to approach for help with these problems.
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Useful Links: Adopting Older Children, Australia


From the Eyes of The Child - A Girl. Adopted. Writing to Change the Lives of Others with the Same Story
fromtheeyesofthechild.wordpress.com fromtheeyesofthechild.wordpress.com

/showurl.php?url=3025 From what I have seen just looking around a little bit before I did this... This tends to be the most controversial post ever...

So let me just preface mine a little bit before we dive right in.

1. I am happy being adopted. If you were hoping to read something else… then I apologize but your not going to find that here.
2. No, I do not look anything like my parents. However, my family does look kind of like a puzzle. We are all within one shade of each other! (Yeah, try that one for size!)
3. I am so grateful for all the response I have gotten so far. It truly has been a privilege to meet the people I have and talk to those who have had interest. Just a little update. The site has reached a total of 30 different countries! Shout out to my readers in Australia, the UK and Canada!

That being said... lets dive in!
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Blogs: Adoptees


"Why Can't I Have My Children Back, Mother Asks" - Cambodian mother accuses Australian church of separating her from her children, filmmaker charged over dispute urges Julie Bishop to intervene
www.abc.net.au www.abc.net.au

/showurl.php?url=3024 An Australian filmmaker has been given a two-year suspended jail sentence by a Cambodian court for threatening to defame a girls refuge in Phnom Penh.
...
The refuge was established to protect Cambodian girls who have been abused, trafficked or are at risk of trafficking, but Ricketson argues the two girls do not fit any of these categories and are being held against the will of their parents.
...
Tara Winkler from the Cambodian Children's Trust says local law states a parent should be able to take their children back whenever they like. Ms Winkler, who in 2011 was named the NSW Young Australian of the Year for her work running a Cambodian orphanage, believes charities need to stop separating children from their families, no matter how poor they are. "The best place for a child is always with the family. Even if an orphanage is trying to do good things for the kids, it's no substitute for family," she said.
...
Citipointe says it has reintegrated 29 children back into Cambodian families since 2009 and hopes to reunite Chanti with her daughters soon.
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Media: Australia, Cambodia, Religion


Don't Talk Negatively About My Birthfamily
www.adoption.net www.adoption.net

/showurl.php?url=3023 No matter the circumstances your adopted child came to you, never speak negatively about your child’s birthfamily. There is always a way to turn a negative life event into a positive one. Always remember, if it were not for your adopted child’s birth family, you would not have your little blessing today. What does an adoptive parent gain to tell their child of the horrific abuse or drug abuse of their birthmother? It will not change the love an adoptee has for their birthmother developed in the womb. I have heard that a few, not all, adoptive parents don’t mind divulging the fact that their child’s birthmother was on drugs, a prostitute, negligent, etc. hoping their adopted child would hate their birth parents and deter them from searching or making contact with their birthfamily.
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Blogs: Birth Parents


March 2014

Children Of A Lesser God
www.abc.net.au www.abc.net.au

/showurl.php?url=3022 What drives a young Sydney woman to drop her glamorous career in the film industry to open an orphanage in Cambodia? Tara Winkler was just twenty-two when she established the Cambodian Children's Trust in Cambodia. She is now 'mother', mentor and older sister to twenty-seven orphans, some as young as two. Her grandmother was a holocaust survivor and she strongly identified with the plight of children in a country still scarred by genocide. Tara Winkler's work has helped her overcome her own demons. As a teenager, she suffered depression, now she says she simply 'doesn't have time' to be depressed...
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Media: Australia, Cambodia


Three generations of adoption
www.theguardian.com www.theguardian.com

/showurl.php?url=3021 When Ray Victor Lewis's mother gave him up for adoption in 1936, she left him with a small Bible. Inside the front cover, the inscription reads, "Ray of Sunshine, Victorious over all." Ray's name wasn't changed by his new parents, although he was a baby. Nor were the circumstances of his adoption kept from him. Ray always knew it was because his birth mother was only 17 when she had him. There was contact, too - she visited and wrote to Ray until he was a toddler and she could no longer handle it. "The last letter she wrote was one my [adoptive] mum treasured," recalls Ray, 78. "I think she felt it would help me to have something to explain why my birth mother couldn't keep me." After Ray and his wife, Janet, married, they decided to adopt too. By now it was 1968 and parents were encouraged to give babies a new name, and often received no information at all about the birth family. So Karen, 45, always knew she was adopted but grew up knowing nothing about her origins, even that her name had been changed.
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Media: United Kingdom


February 2014

Intercountry adoption in the new millennium; the “quiet migration” revisited  
www.aican.org www.aican.org
Intercountry adoption is not usually seen as a matter for demographers, although articles in the International Migration Review have looked at international adoption as a migratory process. This article outlines the author’s estimate of the number of intercountry adoptions world-wide, using data recorded by 18 receiving states in the 1990s. Data from selected receiving countries are used to estimate the number of adoptions from states of origin. Comparisons are made with data for 14 countries over the period 1980–89 collated by Kane (1993). The global estimate of at least 32,000 adoptions in 1998 is much higher than the numbers usually cited and suggest a rise of fifty percent over the previous decade. Total numbers are dominated by adoptions to the United States and from China and Russia. However standardisation against population size or number of live births suggests that the highest rates among receiving states are to be found in Scandinavia, while the highest rates for states of origin are in countries of Eastern Europe, followed by Korea – countries typified by very low birth rates. The article ends with a discussion of the implications of these findings for the future of international controls and the implementation of the 1993 Hague Convention.
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Peter Selman: Statistics


Trends in Intercountry Adoption: Analysis of Data DataData from 20 Receiving Countries, 1998–2004  
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The implications of developments in intercountry adoption worldwide in the early years of the twenty-first century are explored, based on analysis of data from 20 receiving countries. Between 1998 and 2004, intercountry adoption increased by 42 per cent. Problems in data collection and analysis are examined, as is the reliability of estimates of numbers of children sent by countries of origin when derived from data provided by receiving countries. Also considered are various measures of standardization which can be used to facilitate comparison between countries and show trends over time. The potential for more detailed comparative analysis is explored.
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Peter Selman: Statistics


Global Trends in Intercountry Adoption: 2001-2010  
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/showurl.php?url=3018 The decline in the number of intercountry adoptions in the United States over the past six years is well known. The aim of this paper is to go behind these numbers to explore this decline, and the rise that preceded it, in a global context. Data on 23 receiving states have been used and the analysis will extend to the end of 2010, so covering the expedited adoptions following the earthquake in Haiti, the case of Artyom Savelyev and its impact on Russian adoption, and the ongoing problems surrounding other sending countries such as Guatemala, Nepal, and Vietnam. The implications of these changes and prospects for the future will be discussed with special reference to Africa as a more recent major source of internationally adopted children.
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Peter Selman: Statistics


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